Author Topic: Seven ways Rick Perry wants to change the Constitution  (Read 4306 times)

Offline White Wolf

  • Distinguished Member
  • Posts: 7,737
    • View Profile
Seven ways Rick Perry wants to change the Constitution
« on: August 20, 2011, 07:22:13 PM »
.
By Chris Moody | The Ticket – Fri, Aug 19, 2011.. .
.




Rick Perry has many ideas about how to change the American government's founding document. From ending lifetime tenure for federal judges to completely scrapping two whole amendments, the Constitution would see a major overhaul if the Texas governor and Republican presidential candidate had his druthers.

Perry laid out these proposed innovations to the founding document in his book, Fed Up! Our Fight to Save America from Washington. He has occasionally mentioned them on the campaign trail. Several of his ideas fall within the realm of mainstream conservative thinking today, but, as you will see, there are also a few surprises.
 
1. Abolish lifetime tenure for federal judges by amending Article III, Section I of the Constitution.
 
The nation's framers established a federal court system whereby judges with "good behavior" would be secure in their job for life. Perry believes that provision is ready for an overhaul.
 
"The Judges," reads Article III, "both of the supreme and inferior Courts, shall hold their Offices during good Behavior, and shall, at stated Times, receive for their Services a Compensation which shall not be diminished during their Continuance in Office."
 
Perry makes it no secret that he believes the judges on the bench over the past century have acted beyond their constitutional bounds. The problem, Perry reasons, is that members of the judiciary are "unaccountable" to the people, and their lifetime tenure gives them free license to act however they want. In his book, the governor speaks highly of plans to limit their tenure and offers proposals about how to accomplish it.
 
"'[W]e should take steps to restrict the unlimited power of the courts to rule over us with no accountability," he writes in Fed Up! "There are a number of ideas about how to do this . . . . One such reform would be to institute term limits on what are now lifetime appointments for federal judges, particularly those on the Supreme Court or the circuit courts, which have so much power. One proposal, for example, would have judges roll off every two years based on seniority."
 
2. Congress should have the power to override Supreme Court decisions with a two-thirds vote.
 
Ending lifetime tenure for federal justices isn't the only way Perry has proposed suppressing the power of the courts. His book excoriates at length what he sees as overreach from the judicial branch. (The title of Chapter Six is "Nine Unelected Judges Tell Us How to Live.")
 
Giving Congress the ability to veto their decisions would be another way to take the Court down a notch, Perry says.
 
"[A]llow Congress to override the Supreme Court with a two-thirds vote in both the House and Senate, which risks increased politicization of judicial decisions, but also has the benefit of letting the people stop the Court from unilaterally deciding policy," he writes.
 
3. Scrap the federal income tax by repealing the Sixteenth Amendment.
 

The Sixteenth Amendment gives Congress the "power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration." It should be abolished immediately, Perry says.
 
Calling the Sixteenth Amendment "the great milestone on the road to serfdom," Perry's writes that it provides a virtually blank check to the federal government to use for projects with little or no consultation from the states.
 
4. End the direct election of senators by repealing the Seventeenth Amendment.
 

Overturning this amendment would restore the original language of the Constitution, which gave state legislators the power to appoint the members of the Senate.
 
Ratified during the Progressive Era in 1913 , the same year as the Sixteenth Amendment, the Seventeenth Amendment gives citizens the ability to elect senators on their own. Perry writes that supporters of the amendment at the time were "mistakenly" propelled by "a fit of populist rage."
 
"The American people mistakenly empowered the federal government during a fit of populist rage in the early twentieth century by giving it an unlimited source of income (the Sixteenth Amendment) and by changing the way senators are elected (the Seventeenth Amendment)," he writes.
 
5. Require the federal government to balance its budget every year.
 
Of all his proposed ideas, Perry calls this one "the most important," and of all the plans, a balanced budget amendment likely has the best chance of passage.
 
"The most important thing we could do is amend the Constitution--now--to restrict federal spending," Perry writes in his book. "There are generally thought to be two options: the traditional 'balanced budget amendment' or a straightforward 'spending limit amendment,' either of which would be a significant improvement. I prefer the latter . . . . Let's use the people's document--the Constitution--to put an actual spending limit in place to control the beast in Washington."
 
A campaign to pass a balanced budget amendment through Congress fell short by just one vote in the Senate in the 1990s.
 
Last year, House Republicans proposed a spending-limit amendment that would limit federal spending to 20 percent of the economy. According to the amendment's language, the restriction could be overridden by a two-thirds vote in both Houses of Congress or by a declaration of war.
 
6. The federal Constitution should define marriage as between one man and one woman in all 50 states.

Despite saying last month that he was "fine with" states like New York allowing gay marriage, Perry has now said he supports a constitutional amendment that would permanently ban gay marriage throughout the country and overturn any state laws that define marriage beyond a relationship between one man and one woman.
 
"I do respect a state's right to have a different opinion and take a different tack if you will, California did that," Perry told the Christian Broadcasting Network in August. "I respect that right, but our founding fathers also said, 'Listen, if you all in the future think things are so important that you need to change the Constitution here's the way you do it'.
 
In an interview with The Ticket earlier this month, Perry spokeswoman Katherine Cesinger said that even though it would overturn laws in several states, the amendment still fits into Perry's broader philosophy because amendments require the ratification of three-fourths of the states to be added to the Constitution.
 
7. Abortion should be made illegal throughout the country.

Like the gay marriage issue, Perry at one time believed that abortion policy should be left to the states, as was the case before the 1973 Supreme Court case Roe v. Wade. But in the same Christian Broadcasting Network interview, Perry said that he would support a federal amendment outlawing abortion because it was "so important...to the soul of this country and to the traditional values [of] our founding fathers."


http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/ticket/seven-ways-rick-perry-wants-change-constitution-131634517.html

I can't help but think that some of his ideas is a disaster waiting to happen. But maybe its just me.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2011, 07:33:39 PM by White Wolf »
Human Nature. Without a common enemy , men will look for foes in the one place they can guarantee finding one: The Past. -Eoforth, Sigmar's right hand man,

A mind without a purpose will walk in dark places. - Gideon Ravenor, Inquisitor of the Imperium of Mankind.

Offline Fiery Little One

  • Distinguished Member
  • Posts: 7,794
  • Live Long and Prosper
    • View Profile
Re: Seven ways Rick Perry wants to change the Constitution
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2011, 07:48:57 PM »
M'kay... Outside observer's POV on this guy's plans.

1 and 2 make me think he has a problem with your legal system...

3 would make him popular with people who hate paying their taxes, but it also seems INCREDIBLY short sighted and for one good reason. Outside of asking for loans from other countries, how would your country pay for the things it needs to do.

4 isn't your government's whole thing "For the people, By the people."

5 would probably be the only thing he'd get off the ground.

6 & 7? Not a flippin' chance.
Open your mind to new possibilities
-Trip(sort of), The Crossing

Offline Flagg

  • Board Legend
  • Posts: 16,202
  • Gotham's Reckoning
    • View Profile
Re: Seven ways Rick Perry wants to change the Constitution
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2011, 09:34:44 PM »
Rick Perry is an insane Texan. NEWSFLASH!


Offline White Wolf

  • Distinguished Member
  • Posts: 7,737
    • View Profile
Re: Seven ways Rick Perry wants to change the Constitution
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2011, 09:51:58 PM »
Hmm, Gun in the air and firing.  My douche bag governor is already breaking the law.
Human Nature. Without a common enemy , men will look for foes in the one place they can guarantee finding one: The Past. -Eoforth, Sigmar's right hand man,

A mind without a purpose will walk in dark places. - Gideon Ravenor, Inquisitor of the Imperium of Mankind.

Offline Razor

  • Board Legend
  • Posts: 15,820
  • All things not of this world
    • View Profile
Re: Seven ways Rick Perry wants to change the Constitution
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2011, 02:03:13 AM »
Dammit Flagg what has your birth state done to us this time.
“The boat dipped and swayed and sometimes took on water, but it did not sink; the two brothers had waterproofed it well. I do not know where it finally fetched up, if it ever did; perhaps it reached the sea and sails there forever, like a magic boat in a fairytale. All I know is that it was still afloat and still running on the breast of the flood when it passed the incorporated town limits of Derry, Maine, and there it passes out of this tale forever.” ― Stephen King, It"
High priest in the Cult of J

Offline The Unbound

  • Active Member
  • Posts: 303
    • View Profile
Re: Seven ways Rick Perry wants to change the Constitution
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2011, 06:24:03 AM »
So let me see if I understand this right:

On the one hand he rages against judges having too much power while not being elected officials, on the other hand, he wants to end the practice of having senators be elected officials. On the one hand he bangs on constantly on how the Federal government is a raging, power-mad beast, on the other hand, he wants to use exactly that institution to take away state autonomy on two extremely important and controversial topics.

This all seems to boil down to "less power to people who disagree with me (supreme court judges), more power to people who agree with me (on abortion and gay marriage). And 'boo!' to taxes."

I could also rant for a while on the importance of the Independence of the third estate or the potentially crucial role of government overspending during an economic crisis, but I can't really be bothered.
Steady on.

Offline White Wolf

  • Distinguished Member
  • Posts: 7,737
    • View Profile
Re: Seven ways Rick Perry wants to change the Constitution
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2011, 08:25:12 AM »
Right on the head, Unbound.
Human Nature. Without a common enemy , men will look for foes in the one place they can guarantee finding one: The Past. -Eoforth, Sigmar's right hand man,

A mind without a purpose will walk in dark places. - Gideon Ravenor, Inquisitor of the Imperium of Mankind.

Offline Flagg

  • Board Legend
  • Posts: 16,202
  • Gotham's Reckoning
    • View Profile
Re: Seven ways Rick Perry wants to change the Constitution
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2011, 11:03:35 AM »
Just because I'm an asshole.


Offline White Wolf

  • Distinguished Member
  • Posts: 7,737
    • View Profile
Re: Seven ways Rick Perry wants to change the Constitution
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2011, 04:31:46 PM »
Walk softly and carry a big rifle, Flagg?  ;D
Human Nature. Without a common enemy , men will look for foes in the one place they can guarantee finding one: The Past. -Eoforth, Sigmar's right hand man,

A mind without a purpose will walk in dark places. - Gideon Ravenor, Inquisitor of the Imperium of Mankind.

Offline J.Grey

  • Junior Member
  • Posts: 58
    • View Profile
Re: Seven ways Rick Perry wants to change the Constitution
« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2012, 07:25:17 AM »
Sometimes the Constitution needs a refit...

Offline Xero

  • Board Legend
  • Posts: 11,583
  • Let the big man do his job.
    • View Profile
Re: Seven ways Rick Perry wants to change the Constitution
« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2012, 05:21:30 PM »
Rick Perry is an insane Texan. NEWSFLASH!


I don't think you need the "insane" part of that discription. Just saying he's "Texan" should be mroe then enough.  :P
"Well Steve, I think it's more like we both had this rich neighbor named Xerox and I broke into his house to steal the TV set and found out that you had already stolen it." - Bill Gate's response to Steve Jobs' accusation of theft.

Offline J.Grey

  • Junior Member
  • Posts: 58
    • View Profile
Re: Seven ways Rick Perry wants to change the Constitution
« Reply #11 on: March 11, 2012, 04:13:49 AM »
Some of this makes sense. Judges should not have lifetime tenures, they should be accountable for their actions like everyone else in the legal profession... maybe even more so. As for gay marriage? I think that gays have it far too easy. Gay guys get to fall into relationships with partners who like beer, sci-fi and video-games. I think it's about time they suffered along with the rest of us.
All joking aside, marriage is an outmoded concept which is almost completely meaningless now. We shouldn't be asking if there should be same sex marriages, we should be thinking that it's about time that this flawed system of permanent coupling shouldn't be done away with for something that actually works.

Offline Data007

  • Eminent Member
  • Posts: 5,478
  • What? You don't have voices in your head?
    • View Profile
Re: Seven ways Rick Perry wants to change the Constitution
« Reply #12 on: March 12, 2012, 12:18:16 PM »
We, at least Canada anyway, do. It's a civil union which is fancy talk for common law marriage. The legal ties there aren't as binding as the full on ceremony, and you don't even need a whole lot of documentation

Judges, on the other hand, are accountable to the Supreme Court, and as much as we may dislike the decisions they sometimes make, there's a reason they aren't voted in. If judges were voted in, that would merely be another politicized position in the three branches of government, and instead of the neutrality of law, you get the popular judges who ran the best campaign. The Law has to be above that, or what people perceive as the government against the people is only going to get worse. Instead, the Legislative Branch needs to butt out of the Judiciary, and leave sentencing and interpretation up to them. This is true both here and in the States, where minimum sentence laws are passed, taking that choice out of the judges' hands. Where a judge could look at the circumstances of a case, the surrounding events, and judge accordingly. Nowadays, more judges are left with only one tool, a sledgehammer, to use, and they don't fight it as much as they could, because they all want to be appointed to the Supreme Court. And voting for judges? That would only split the law further, into jurisdictional demographics, where a liberal judge would quite quickly be voted out in a conservative riding because he's too soft, or because he didn't throw that gay couple in jail.
"Titans are the God-Machines of the Adeptus Mechanicus. Imagine a city. Now imagine that city is angry at you, can walk, and has continent leveling weapons aimed at you. And is inhabited by more things that hate you. You have a rough idea of a Titan."

"With the first link, the chain is forged. The first speech censored, the first thought forbidden, the first freedom denied chains us all irrevocably." Judge Aaron Satie

New Haven Chronicles